New York CIty Council Member Ben Kallos

New York Post

New York Post De Blasio suggests mandatory composting, offers few details by Julia Marsh

De Blasio suggests mandatory composting, offers few details

Mayor Bill de Blasio proposed mandatory composting during his Earth Day announcement, but in September, he temporarily shelved expansion of a pilot project to recycle food scraps due to low use.

The project more than doubled curbside composting collection from 13,000 tons in fiscal year 2017 to 31,000 tons in 2018, according to the Department of Sanitation. But the city generates 14 million tons of garbage a year, about one-third of which is food waste, so the increase in composting made only a tiny dent in landfill reduction.

New York Post It’s time for the City Council to stop playing thought police by Post Editorial Board

It’s time for the City Council to stop playing thought police

When it comes to tolerating dissent or even unapproved wave-making, the New York City Council is starting to look a bit like the old Soviet Politburo.

The latest: Councilman Ben Kallos (D-Manhattan) saw his land-use subcommittee shut down, apparently because he’d been asking too many uncomfortable questions about the mayor’s affordable-housing and tax-break deals.

Kallos himself didn’t suffer. By all accounts, he’s happy that he wound up being elevated to helm the Contracts Committee, where his brand of oversight won’t ruffle colleagues’ feathers.

New York Post Councilman: NASCAR is more transparent than New York politicians by Rich Calder

Councilman: NASCAR is more transparent than New York politicians

A Manhattan lawmaker says NASCAR provides more information about its sponsors than politicians do about their contributors, so he’s introducing legislation that would require pie charts showing where each candidate in a city race gets their money.

Councilman Ben Kallos said his bill would yield the “most transparent” information ever for voters in New York City.

The information would be easily readable in pie chart form and delineate special interest contributions, including contributions from real estate developers and lobbyists. The data would be made available by the city’s Campaign Finance Board, both online and in official voter guides mailed before elections to all voters.

New York Post New bill would ban soda as default drink in kids’ meals by Rich Calder

New bill would ban soda as default drink in kids’ meals

Kids who enjoy soda with their happy meals might not be too sweet about a new bill approved by the City Council on Thursday.

The legislation drafted by Councilman Ben Kallos (D-Manhattan) makes water, milk and 100 percent fruit or vegetable juice the “default beverage option” in all kids’ meals served at restaurants.

Kallos said his bill’s goal is to tackle childhood obesity.

“Healthy drinks with kid’s meals will be the new normal in New York City no matter where our kids are eating,” he said.

The new law is not an outright ban. Parents could still request soda or other sugary beverages when placing their order.

It would apply to all restaurants that serve kids’ meals.

Unlike former Mayor Mike Bloomberg’s failed attempt to ban sales of large sodas at food outlets and movie theaters, the bill has the support of the American Beverage Association.

New York Post De Blasio isn’t sold on proposed sugar law for chain restaurants by Rich Calder

De Blasio isn’t sold on proposed sugar law for chain restaurants

The de Blasio administration is sour on legislation that would require chain restaurants to list products with added sugar because it could be difficult to enforce, a city official said Monday.

New York Post New law proposes school bus cameras to catch unsafe motorists by Bernadette Hogan

New law proposes school bus cameras to catch unsafe motorists

Cameras are just about everywhere and now a Manhattan legislator wants to add them on school buses

Motorists are supposed to hit the brakes when confronted by a stopped school bus.

But an estimated 50,000 a year statewide ignore the safety regulation.

New York Post Bill would require NYC developers to disclose relationships with politicians by Rich Calder

Bill would require NYC developers to disclose relationships with politicians

Developers who want to do business with the city would be required to publicly disclose previous relationships with government officials under a bill being introduced Wednesday at the City Council.

“Well-connected developers should not be getting sweetheart deals on the taxpayers’ dime,” said Councilman Ben Kallos (D-Manhattan), the bill’s sponsor.

Under the bill, the city’s Department of Housing Preservation and Development would be required to give the Council the “compliance package” submitted by prospective developers for mandatory background checks.

New York Post NYC politicians still use Amazon despite slamming HQ2 by Carl Campanile

NYC politicians still use Amazon despite slamming HQ2

Upper East Side Councilman Ben Kallos attended an anti-Amazon rally in Long Island City last week, but told The Post, “You have me dead to rights,” when asked about his own Amazon Wish List.

“I’m a dad. Tech companies make my life easier,” he said, adding that doesn’t mean Amazon should get its own private helipad.

“Even a billionaire like Mike Bloomberg rode the subway,” Kallos said.

New York Post Something must be done about the city’s school bus system by Michael Benjamin

Something must be done about the city’s school bus system

Kallos’ bill also requires OPT to provide real-time GPS data via an authorized app to parents and school administrators. An app-based program would eliminate having bus drivers and escorts fielding frantic and angry calls from parents and administrators — when they should be focused on getting the children to and from home safely.

Although all special-ed buses and two-thirds of contracted school buses have “Navman” GPS devices installed, the DOE lags behind other school districts that have deployed pupil-transport tracking technology for parents and administrators.

Meanwhile, like other parents who complained, Susie was told that adjusted routes would be forthcoming soon to make Max’s commute shorter. We’re still waiting.

 

New York Post NYC will vote on donation limits for next citywide races by Nolan Hicks

NYC will vote on donation limits for next citywide races

To encourage smaller donors, the commission also recommended boosting the current 6-to-1 match of public funds to 8-to-1 and to increase the maximum amount matched from $175 to $250 for the citywide candidates.

So a mayoral candidate who got a $250 contribution from a New York City resident would collect an extra $2,000 in public matching funds.

“It’s up to New Yorkers to vote big money out of politics this November,” said Councilman Ben Kallos (D-Manhattan), who helped draft the changes adopted by the commission.