New York CIty Council Member Ben Kallos

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Gotham Gazette De Blasio, City Council Look to Move Ahead with Private Sector Retirement Savings Program by Samar Khurshid

De Blasio, City Council Look to Move Ahead with Private Sector Retirement Savings Program

In his State of the City speech in January, Mayor Bill de Blasio promised that the city would create a system of retirement security for millions of New Yorkers who work in the private sector and may not have access to employer-provided savings plans. It was a revival of an effort the mayor had first pushed in 2016 but that bumped up against the change in presidential administrations and federal approvals apparently needed. But eight months after de Blasio’s speech at the start of this year, the New York City Council is ready to look at the idea through two bills that will be examined at a hearing later this month.   

Wall Street Journal Investigation of New York City Shelter Operator Grows by Katie Honan

Investigation of New York City Shelter Operator Grows

Mr. Medina is the former CEO of Puerto Rican Organization to Motivate, Enlighten and Serve Addicts, a nonprofit affiliate of Acacia. Neither he nor Distinctive Maintenance’s management team could be reached for comment.

After the city launched its initial investigation, City Councilman Ben Kallos, a Democrat who represents parts of Manhattan, called for a hearing on nonprofit city contractors.

He said the city should not have to worry about “self-dealing,” especially with funding for the city’s neediest. The hearing hasn’t yet been scheduled.

The Villager Immigrant artists depict their experience by ALEJANDRA O’CONNELL-DOMENECH

Immigrant artists depict their experience

Young immigrant artists are getting some much needed space in an Upper East Side apartment building.

Some commercial space at the St. Tropez building on 340 E. 64th St. has officially been transformed into a new gallery by Chashama, a nonprofit organization that finds unused real estate for artist gallery and studio use. City Councilmember Ben Kallos, who funded all four of the exhibitions scheduled to occupy the gallery, has allocated a total of $80,000 to the nonprofit over the last three years.

Upper East Side Patch Nonprofit Gallery Featuring Immigrant Artists Opens On UES by Brendal Krisel

Nonprofit Gallery Featuring Immigrant Artists Opens On UES

UPPER EAST SIDE, NY — A nonprofit that turns under-utilized real estate into spaces where artists can create and present their artworks opened a new studio on Monday that will feature the work of immigrant artists for its debut exhibit, the nonprofit and local elected officials announced.

The organization Chashama renovated an empty space in the St. Tropez condo complex on East 64th Street near First Avenue into an art gallery following the building's donation of the space. City Councilman Ben Kallos, the nonprofit and artists celebrated the opening of the space Monday with a ribbon cutting ceremony.

Upper East Side Patch Help UES Council Members Spend $1M On Neighborhood by Brandon Krisel

Help UES Council Members Spend $1M On Neighborhood

Voting opens on March 30 and end April 7 for New York City's eighth participatory budgeting cycle, city officials said. Residents of the Upper East Side will vote on whether to fund projects selected as finalists by City Council members Keith Powers or Ben Kallos, depending on whether they live within the council's fourth or fifth district.

Projects selected as finalists for participatory budgeting address community needs such as housing and school improvements, park upgrades, public safety and senior services. Most projects don't carry a funding value of $1 million, so multiple projects can win funding. If certain projects prove popular, city council members may chose to allocate even more funds.

Our Town OTTY 2019 Honoree: Writing laws for everyone by CHRISTOPHER MOORE

OTTY 2019 Honoree: Writing laws for everyone

East Side Council Member Ben Kallos says his answer is “cheesy.”

The 38-year-old rising star in Manhattan politics has been asked about his greatest accomplishment. He points first to the little girl that he and his wife welcomed last year.

“My daughter is the end-all and be-all of my life. And to the extent that’s an accomplishment, it starts and ends there—just to have the privilege of being a father. But I think that’s just a personal milestone,” he says, speaking at his desk in his East 93rd Street office. Snow falls on the other side of the window. He’s wearing a blue suit, white shirt and no tie, talking easily and without the requisite staff members that so often sit in on a politician’s interview.

“I take paternity leave pretty seriously and family leave pretty seriously,” he adds, “and I admit I’ve been a little bit of a bully with any men that I know who aren’t taking leave because I think both partners regardless of gender should be taking an equal and active role in the child-rearing process.”

NY1 Proposal to Change Social Media Policies at Tourist At­trac­tions by Pat Kiernan

Proposal to Change Social Media Policies at Tourist At­trac­tions

MORNINGS ON 1

Proposal to Change Social Media Policies at Tourist At­trac­tions

BY SPECTRUM NEWS STAFF 
PUBLISHED 9:38 AM ET MAR. 21, 2019

 

Next time you take a picture at a tourist attraction, you may want to read the fine print first. 

The most recent installation to pop up in the city is the Vessel at Hudson Yards. 

It's already caused a social media frenzy, with New Yorkers and tourists alike snapping selfies in front of the 150 foot-tall, honeycomb-like structure. 

But, critics are questioning a policy that grants the owners of the Vessel access to content taken at and of the site. 

After backlash, they softened the original language to make it clear visitors own their photos, but that the Vessel retains the right to re-use those images.

Councilman Ben Kallos says this issue has shone a light on the issue of ownership in the age of social media.

He is now proposing legislation to ban tourist attractions from forcing visitors to give up ownership of their photos or identities.

PIX11 Pictures of art structure at Hudson Yards become subject of controversy by GREG MOCKER

Pictures of art structure at Hudson Yards become subject of controversy

NYC Councilmember Ben Kallos, from the Upper East Side, said he planned to introduce legislation to make sure that tourists' photos and videos "are not taken and sold to the highest bidder."

"Security cameras can help keep us safe, but storing footage for marketing is a nightmare," Kallos said. He suggested that if photo-use policies similar to the Vessel's are in place elsewhere the Council should examine that as well.

Social media companies also have terms and conditions that grant permissions for use to the company.Purchasing a ticket for many other attractions and events also gives consent for photography.

San Francisco Chronicle Critics question policy on photos of climbable NYC sculpture by Karen Matthews

Critics question policy on photos of climbable NYC sculpture

But City Council member Ben Kallos, a Manhattan Democrat, said he planned to introduce legislation to make sure that tourists' photos and videos "are not taken and sold to the highest bidder."

"Security cameras can help keep us safe, but storing footage for marketing is a nightmare," Kallos said. He suggested that if photo-use policies similar to the Vessel's are in place elsewhere the Council should examine that as well.

"Now that we are aware of the problem I will be looking into this citywide and I hope I will have the help and support of Hudson Yards," Kallos said.

CBS New York Vessel’s Photo Policy Claims The Pictures You Take At Hudson Yards Don’t Belong To You by Alice Gainer

Vessel’s Photo Policy Claims The Pictures You Take At Hudson Yards Don’t Belong To You

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) – “Vessel,” the eye catching landmark at Hudson Yards officially opened to the public Friday and is now already embroiled in a social media controversy.

“There’s so many different angles it’s an instagrammable paradise,” photographer Rene Clement said.

“Amazing… just going up and down and seeing the view from up there, beautiful,” one visitor told CBS2’s Alice Gainer.

Despite all the fanfare surrounding the attraction, there’s already backlash over its photo policy. In the age of social media, the new rules are catching many people clicking away off guard.

There aren’t any signs posted around Vessel, but if you read your ticket it directs you to the Terms & Conditions page online.

A ticket (with very controversial fine print) to see Vessel at Hudson Yards. (Credit: CBS2)

All those videos and pictures visitors just posted to social media can be used for free by Vessel’s operator – ERY Vessel LLC.

“I hereby grant to company and its affiliates the right to re-post, share, publish, promote and distribute the Vessel Media,” the terms state.

That’s not all. Upon entering the structure, you can be photographed, filmed, or recorded however…

The “Company has the unconditional, irrevocable right to reproduce, display and use the Recordings, including for advertising, marketing and promotional purposes, in all media and formats, whether now known or later developed.”

The terms & conditions when entering Hudson Yards and Vessel in Manhattan. (Credit: CBS2)

“Yeah, I mean that’s kinda crazy because you’d think you’d have to sign a release to be able to do that,” Lizzie Goodman of Brooklyn said.

“That’s how social media is. If you’re putting it out there for the world to see then I feel like it’s their piece they have the right to take it,” Harlem resident Crawford Horton argued.

“It’s disgusting,” Rene Clement charged.

One attorney says that the Vessel has gone too far.

“I would say it’s overreaching,” entertainment and media attorney Craig Delsack declared.

Delsack added normally you’d see a big physical sign warning people that they’re walking into an area where filming could be taking place. As for their social media policy, that also bothers the lawyer.

“That’s not fair because if you are the Annie Leibovitz of instagrammable photos you’re going to want to be paid for that commercial use by someone else.”

City councilman Ben Kallos says he’s taking action to try and change this policy.

“I don’t think that Hudson Yards should be allowed to take someone’s identity or their photos and sell them and that’s why i’m introducing legislation in New York City to make it illegal,” Kallos explained.

 

(Credit: CBS2)

A spokesperson for Hudson Yards told CBS2 they wanted to over-communicate and be transparent.

So is there anyway to protect your selfie at Vessel from being used by someone else? All the social media sites have their own terms and conditions and – even in their terms and conditions – if you post a picture of something, we Twitter, Facebook, Instagram get to use that image as well,” Delsack warns.

So if you’re truly concerned about where your images will end up, the only surefire way to protect your rights (at the moment) is to keep them off the internet.