New York CIty Council Member Ben Kallos

Health

Public health is a necessity in a City as large as ours. All of us from infants to seniors should have access to quality health care. We must support our health institutions and provide preventative health care services such as immunizations to lower expensive treatment costs. Cutting vital health care services from our budget has historically only increased treatment costs in the long term. Through proper support and preventative health care services we can make our City a healthier place to live.

New York Times New York Is a Noisy City. One Man Got Revenge. by Winnie Hu

New York Is a Noisy City. One Man Got Revenge.

Mr. Edison asked that the exact amount not be disclosed because he had signed a confidentiality agreement.

Mr. Edison said he gave half the money to a local soup kitchen and several nonprofit groups. “I don’t think you should make money on the suffering of other people — a lot of people around here were upset by the noise,” he said.

Mr. Mihalis declined to comment and Mr. Cohen and lawyers who handled the settlement did not respond to requests for comment.

City Councilman Ben Kallos, who represents the Upper East Side and is also a lawyer, said Mr. Edison was pursuing an unusual legal route.

Small claims court is typically the last resort for settling disputes over specific monetary damages — not a venue for fighting quality-of-life issues.

“I’m pleasantly surprised that he was able to win some small victory,” he said.

Jack Grant, a longtime friend of Mr. Edison’s, said Mr. Edison does not back down. “When he believes in something, Mike will stick to it until it gets done,” he said.

The River Dale Press 2 Deadly bacteria might be festering in your cooling towers by Zak Kostro

Deadly bacteria might be festering in your cooling towers

City lawmakers want to curb the proliferation of a deadly disease, which means taking aim at cooling towers — and some landlords who reportedly aren’t keeping up with inspections — in an effort to snuff out Legionnaires’ disease at the root.

The city council passed a bill March 28 designed to toughen a law combating the rising number of Legionnaires’ cases in the city. The original law — passed following the deadliest outbreak of the disease in the city’s history in 2015 — produced somewhat tepid results.

Crain's New York City Council approves bill targeting sugary drinks by JONATHAN LAMANTIA

City Council approves bill targeting sugary drinks

Restaurants that disobey the law would be subject to monetary penalties.

Public health advocates and the city Health Department supported the bill during a City Council hearing last month. The Health Department has described reducing the consumption of sugary beverages as a top agency priority. Nearly 1 in 5 children ages 6 to 19 are obese citywide.

"We know this change will do a lot to keep sugary drinks away from our children, helping them avoid childhood obesity and grow up to be healthy adults," Councilman Ben Kallos, the bill's sponsor, said in a statement.

Separately, the council approved a bill that would allow for the removal of a physician's name from a patient's birth certificate if the doctor's license has been surrendered or revoked for misconduct. The bill was introduced following BuzzFeed News' story on a patient who had been sexually abused by the OB/GYN who delivered her children. 

Upper East Side Patch NYC Votes To Ban Restaurants From Offering Kids Sugary Drinks by Noah Manskar

NYC Votes To Ban Restaurants From Offering Kids Sugary Drinks

NEW YORK — Sorry, kids — now you'll have to ask for that Coke. New York City restaurants will likely be banned from offering kids sugary drinks under legislation the City Council approved Thursday.

The bill restricts the beverages that eateries can offer with children's meals to water, juice and low- or non-fat milk. Restaurants could still give kids soda or another drink if they ask for one, but those that get caught offering heavily sweetened sippables could be fined up to $200.

"Healthy drinks with kid's meals will be the new normal in New York City no matter where they are eating," Councilman Ben Kallos, a Manhattan Democrat who sponsored the bill, said in a statement. "While parents can still order whatever they want the default will be healthy."

New York Post New bill would ban soda as default drink in kids’ meals by Rich Calder

New bill would ban soda as default drink in kids’ meals

Kids who enjoy soda with their happy meals might not be too sweet about a new bill approved by the City Council on Thursday.

The legislation drafted by Councilman Ben Kallos (D-Manhattan) makes water, milk and 100 percent fruit or vegetable juice the “default beverage option” in all kids’ meals served at restaurants.

Kallos said his bill’s goal is to tackle childhood obesity.

“Healthy drinks with kid’s meals will be the new normal in New York City no matter where our kids are eating,” he said.

The new law is not an outright ban. Parents could still request soda or other sugary beverages when placing their order.

It would apply to all restaurants that serve kids’ meals.

Unlike former Mayor Mike Bloomberg’s failed attempt to ban sales of large sodas at food outlets and movie theaters, the bill has the support of the American Beverage Association.

WCBS Radio City Councilman Pushes For Healthier Drink Options In Kids’ Meals by WCBS News Staff

City Councilman Pushes For Healthier Drink Options In Kids’ Meals

NEW YORK (WCBS 880) — There’s a new initiative at City Hall to make kids’ meals in New York City healthier.

As WCBS 880’s Mike Sugerman reports, many children push their parents for kids’ meals because of the sugary sodas that automatically come with the deal.

WNYC: New York Public Radio City Council Considering Bill Updating Flawed Legionnaires' Law by Sean Carlson and Gwenne Hogan

City Council Considering Bill Updating Flawed Legionnaires' Law

Kallos' legislation, which was passed by the council's Committee on Housing and Buildings Monday, would require landlords to report inspections of their cooling towers soon after they happen to the city's Health Department directly. The city would then make that information public. The bill would make it easier for health inspectors to identify problem buildings, Kallos said, as they currently have to rely on the state's data can be outdated.

The bill would also send regular reminders to cooling tower owners to have their equipment inspected.

"There was a Legionnaires' cluster in my neighborhood. Somebody died. Six people got sick," said Councilman Kallos, referring to a 2017 outbreak of the disease. "My hope is, with these 90-day inspections actually happening no one has to get sick or even die from Legionnaires' ever again."

New York Post De Blasio isn’t sold on proposed sugar law for chain restaurants by Rich Calder

De Blasio isn’t sold on proposed sugar law for chain restaurants

The de Blasio administration is sour on legislation that would require chain restaurants to list products with added sugar because it could be difficult to enforce, a city official said Monday.

Center For Science In The Public Interest New York City Bills Would Help Consumers—Including Kids—Eat Better at Restaurants by Margo G. Wootan

New York City Bills Would Help Consumers—Including Kids—Eat Better at Restaurants

A pair of bills introduced today in the City Council of New York would help consumers—including kids—eat and drink more healthfully at restaurants.

WNYC: New York Public Radio As Cooling Tower Owners Flout Legionnaires' Law, City Council Looks to Crack Dow by Sean Carlson

As Cooling Tower Owners Flout Legionnaires' Law, City Council Looks to Crack Dow

Owners of cooling towers are currently required to have them inspected quarterly and immediately have them cleaned if they show a certain amount of the bacteria that causes Legionnaires' Disease. Cooling tower owners then must submit an annual report documenting the inspections and cleanings.

The new law would require inspection results to be submitted to the city almost immediately after they're received. It would also require the city to send electronic reminders to cooling tower owners of upcoming dates.

"As the Health Department issues violations to bring towers into compliance, many buildings with cooling towers are still failing to report the results of their inspections, leaving us to wonder if inspections are occurring at all," bill sponsor Councilman Ben Kallos said.