New York CIty Council Member Ben Kallos

Health

Public health is a necessity in a City as large as ours. All of us from infants to seniors should have access to quality health care. We must support our health institutions and provide preventative health care services such as immunizations to lower expensive treatment costs. Cutting vital health care services from our budget has historically only increased treatment costs in the long term. Through proper support and preventative health care services we can make our City a healthier place to live.

Gotham Gazette City to Codify Office of Food Policy and Require 10-Year Food Plan by Ethan Geringer-Sameth

City to Codify Office of Food Policy and Require 10-Year Food Plan

A particular emphasis is on food justice and ameliorating the disparate access to healthy foods in predominantly low-income neighborhoods. The expected passage of the bills comes shortly after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled as constitutional the Trump administration’s public charge rule, making it harder for immigrants to obtain a green card when they receive public benefits like food stamps.

“The City of New York is responsible for feeding a large portion of our population, whether it’s 1.1 million public school students who are entitled to free breakfast and free lunch, or it’s people in our senior centers...or people in our shelter system who we’re feeding, or just the countless New Yorkers who rely on food assistance in the form of SNAP,” Kallos, a Manhattan Democrat, told Gotham Gazette.

City Biz List Ben Kallos Joins ProHEALTH Care at Ribbon Cutting to Open the First Pediatric Urgent Care in Manhattan by Press Staff

Ben Kallos Joins ProHEALTH Care at Ribbon Cutting to Open the First Pediatric Urgent Care in Manhattan

ProHEALTH Care, the largest independent, physician-run health system in the nation, hosted a ribbon-cutting ceremony to open the first pediatric-only urgent care in Manhattan. Council Member Ben Kallos joined Zeyad Baker, M.D., president & CEO of ProHEALTH Care, to cut the ribbon, along with Dr. Baker’s two children to welcome the new pediatric urgent care to the community. In addition, ProHEALTH Care will host a special community day on Saturday, February 1, 2020 from 10:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m., featuring free vision and hearing screenings, giveaways, and activities for kids. As part of Optum, the ProHEALTH Pediatric Urgent Care represents Optum’s first clinical entrance into Manhattan.

WCBS Radio City Council Likely To Approve Ban On Toxic Pesticides In NYC Parks by Rich Lamb

City Council Likely To Approve Ban On Toxic Pesticides In NYC Parks

NEW YORK (WCBS 880) — A bill to ban the use of toxic pesticides in New York City parks is up for a vote in the City Council on Wednesday.

The bill, which was proposed in 2019, has generated a slew of support from across the five boroughs.

As WCBS 880’s Rich Lamb reported, supporters stood on the steps of City Hall chanting, “No Roundup. No glyphosates. Stop spraying in our parks.”

Councilman Ben Kallos, who proposed the legislation, says the pesticides are harmful to the environment and humans.

“We’ve been working for five years since 2015. When we were ready to introduce the legislation in 2016, the World Health Organization had just announced that glyphosate, a neuro-disruptor and the active ingredient in Monsanto Roundup was a likely carcinogen,” he said.

The weed killer has been linked to leukemia and lymphoma and the manufacturer has settled multiple lawsuits from those who had used the herbicide.  

“Our goal is to ban this from our parks straight and simple,” he said

The measure has 34 co-sponsors, a veto-proof supermajority and the de Blasio administration now says it supports it.

CityLab Cities Are Worried About the Health Effects of Glyphosate by JEN MONNIER

Cities Are Worried About the Health Effects of Glyphosate

New York City Council Member Ben Kallos first introduced legislation to ban glyphosate (and all chemical pesticides) from city parks in 2015, shortly after the World Health Organization’s verdict that it’s unsafe. During the legislation’s hearing in September 2017, dozens of elementary-school children crowded City Hall to testify their support. The legislation failed, but Kallos and Carlina Rivera reintroduced it in April, just before the EPA classified the chemical as safe. The bill has 24 sponsors; it needs 34 to guarantee a hearing.

Gotham Gazette Food Policy Agenda on Menu at City Council Hearing by Ethan Geringer-Sameth

Food Policy Agenda on Menu at City Council Hearing

The City Council is set to consider a number of bills related to food policy at a hearing Wednesday, including a proposal to codify an Office of Food Policy, a month after Council Speaker Corey Johnson unveiled an expansive food equity plan with the creation of the office at its center.

Washington Blade N.Y. proposal would help LGBT residents by Staff Reports

N.Y. proposal would help LGBT residents

NEW YORK — A new City Council proposal would connect New Yorkers to culturally competent, community-based health care services through an LGBT-inclusive program for uninsured and underinsured people, though fully insured residents are welcome to participate, Gay City News reports

Gay City News City Council Floats Localized Healthcare Program by Matt Tracy

City Council Floats Localized Healthcare Program

A new City Council proposal would connect New Yorkers to culturally competent, community-based healthcare services through an LGBTQ-inclusive program geared towards uninsured and underinsured folks, though fully insured residents are welcome to participate.

FOX 5 WNYW NYC condo owner allegedly converted small apartment into 11 tiny units by Louis Casiano

NYC condo owner allegedly converted small apartment into 11 tiny units

New York City condominium owner illegally converted his one-unit apartment into a duplex with 11 cramped sub-units, some of which had ceilings just 4 1/2 feet high, forcing his tenants to crouch or walk on their knees, officials alleged.

Inspectors with the city's Buildings Department raided the apartment on Manhattan's Lower East Side Aug. 14 after they got a complaint about the cramped conditions, The New York Post reported. The Henry Street building was listed as having 27 apartments on five floors, according to city records.

Owner Xue Ping Ni reportedly carved up the 634-square-foot unit into 11 units with no windows and an illegal bathroom. He was cited with numerous violations totaling $144,000.

New York Times New York Is a Noisy City. One Man Got Revenge. by Winnie Hu

New York Is a Noisy City. One Man Got Revenge.

Mr. Edison asked that the exact amount not be disclosed because he had signed a confidentiality agreement.

Mr. Edison said he gave half the money to a local soup kitchen and several nonprofit groups. “I don’t think you should make money on the suffering of other people — a lot of people around here were upset by the noise,” he said.

Mr. Mihalis declined to comment and Mr. Cohen and lawyers who handled the settlement did not respond to requests for comment.

City Councilman Ben Kallos, who represents the Upper East Side and is also a lawyer, said Mr. Edison was pursuing an unusual legal route.

Small claims court is typically the last resort for settling disputes over specific monetary damages — not a venue for fighting quality-of-life issues.

“I’m pleasantly surprised that he was able to win some small victory,” he said.

Jack Grant, a longtime friend of Mr. Edison’s, said Mr. Edison does not back down. “When he believes in something, Mike will stick to it until it gets done,” he said.