Towed Cars Finder via App and 311 proposed by Council Member Kallos

Towed Cars Finder via App and 311 proposed by Council Member Kallos

Legislation requires towed cars to be reported online and on 311

 
New York, NY – Finding your car when it gets towed is about to get easier thank to legislation introduced today in the City Council by Council Member Ben Kallos. Owners of cars towed due to temporary parking restrictions would be able to find where their car was moved through the Department of Transportation’s (DOT) website or by calling 311. Currently, this is only available for vehicles taken to impound lots because of regular parking violations.
 
“Imagine arriving at your parking spot to find its gone, not knowing if it is stolen or towed, without being able to find out where it is, unless you’ve got the time to walk every block of your neighborhood,” said Council Member Ben Kallos. “Anytime you can’t find your car, New Yorkers should be able to find them online or by calling 311.”
 

Sticker showing reasons a car may be towed due to temporary parking restrictions. Source: http://bedfordandbowery.com/2014/03/what-happens-when-the-movies-tow-your-car-away/.
 
In cases of temporary parking changes, such as a film shoot, a special event, an emergency, or a parade, a vehicle is often moved to surrounding blocks without the owner’s knowledge. Owners returning to find their cars not where they left them may believe the vehicle stolen, particularly when calling 911 or 311 who has no record of the vehicle being towed. According to the Mayor's Office of Media and Entertainment, production companies provide a list of towing locations to the local precinct, but that the precincts are not staffed or set up to provide the seamless information that 311 can. The owners are often instructed to walk surrounding blocks to search for where their vehicle was moved or contact the construction crew, who may be gone by the time the driver returns.
 
“My mother, a single parent who is disabled, had her car towed, from her block in Manhattan to more than five blocks away on a different Avenue,” said Council Member Ben Kallos. “It took hours of walking the district and working with the local precinct to track down the car, which by then was buried in tickets. There should be a law to protect drivers who park on the street so they don’t have to worry about finding their car when they need it.”
 

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