New York CIty Council Member Ben Kallos

Bernadette Hogan

New York Post NYC school reopening plan doesn’t explain how to keep kids safe, lawmakers argue by Julia Marsh, Bernadette Hogan

NYC school reopening plan doesn’t explain how to keep kids safe, lawmakers argue

The city’s plan to reopen public schools this September does not provide enough specifics on how to keep students, teachers and staff safe, city and state elected officials said Friday.

“We need a plan for how to open schools, not more information on how to close them,” Councilman Ben Kallos (D-Manhattan) said about the details laid out hours earlier by Mayor de Blasio and Dept. of Education Chancellor Richard Carranza.

De Blasio announced a “blended approach” of in-class and online teaching as long as the city’s daily positive-test rate for the coronavirus stays under 3 percent. It is currently at 1 percent.

The mayor and chancellor also explained protocols for the quarantine of students and temporary closures of individual buildings if someone at the school test positive for the virus.

But Kallos, a member of the council’s education committee, said that he and other public school parents are looking for something else.

New York Post City school buses can now use cameras to catch reckless drivers by Bernadette Hogan

City school buses can now use cameras to catch reckless drivers

ALBANY — City school districts will soon be allowed to attach camera technology to yellow buses aimed at capturing reckless drivers who whiz past stopped buses, according to a bill Gov. Cuomo signed Tuesday.

Right now only a cop can ticket offenders for $250 a pop, but the legislation grants law enforcement the ability to capture, record and transmit evidence of offenders from the bus itself.

New York Post New law proposes school bus cameras to catch unsafe motorists by Bernadette Hogan

New law proposes school bus cameras to catch unsafe motorists

Cameras are just about everywhere and now a Manhattan legislator wants to add them on school buses

Motorists are supposed to hit the brakes when confronted by a stopped school bus.

But an estimated 50,000 a year statewide ignore the safety regulation.