New York CIty Council Member Ben Kallos

Queens Gazette

Queens Gazette 2018-01-24 / Features Print article PrintNew Law Reduces Construction Noise, Lets City Sleep by Richard Gentilviso

2018-01-24 / Features

Print article Print
New Law Reduces Construction Noise, Lets City Sleep

“By lowering the allowable after-hours noise limit in residential areas, allowing inspectors to take noise readings from the street, rather than from inside an apartment, and empowering inspectors with the ability to issue a stop-work order for noisy equipment, this legislation should bring some much-needed relief to New Yorkers,” Sapienza added.

In its Fiscal 2018 Statement of Community District Needs and Community Board Budget Requests, the number one budget expense item Community Board 1 requested was for DEP to “increase (the) monitoring of air and noise quality” in CB 1.

“Thank you to Mayor Bill de Blasio for signing this bill into law and to the Department of Environmental Protection Commissioner Vincent Sapienza for his agency’s expertise and collaboration on this legislation,” said the bill’s author, Manhattan Council Member Ben Kallos, in the release.

Kallos also thanked “the countless residents who complained regularly about after-hours noise,” which he said, “led to this legislation to keep our city a little bit quieter.”

At the January 16 meeting of CB 1 held at the Astoria World Manor, board officers were re-elected to begin two-year terms from January 1, 2018 to December 31, 2020 as follows:

Queens Gazette Responding To City’s Top Complaint, Noise, In Time To Fix It by Editorial Board

Responding To City’s Top Complaint, Noise, In Time To Fix It

Noise is the number one complaint in New York City, but to NYC Councilman Ben Kallos and NYC Council Environmental Chair Costa Constantinides it doesn’t need to be a fact of life in the Big Apple. Kallos and Constantinides introduced legislation in June to be heard in the fall that would require the city to respond to noise complaints for nightlife and construction within two hours or on a subsequent day within an hour of the time of the complaint. The bill aims to increase the likelihood that inspectors will identify the source of the noise, issue a violation, and restore quiet.

“Noise is such a big problem that it might be better to call us ‘Noise’ York City. If 311 is any indication, residents are tired of all the noise, and it is time we did something about it,” said Councilman Kallos. “It is hard to imagine a government of the people for the people ignoring the people’s top complaint and expecting them to be happy living here. I am disappointed by recent reports that the city is actually doing less to quiet noise as complaints rise. We as a city need to take this problem seriously, take it head on without excuses, and give every New Yorker the peace and quiet they need.”

“The nuisance that bothers New Yorkers most is loud noises, however, it could take days for agencies to respond to noise complaints. By that time, a violation would unlikely be issued.  That's why we're introducing this legislation that would require the city to respond to noise complaints within two hours. New Yorkers deserve a responsive government and noise-free neighborhoods. Thank you to my colleague Council Member Ben Kallos for leading the way on this quality-of-life issue,” said Environmental Committee Chair Constantinides.

Queens Gazette Officials Call For End To Use Of Dirty Fuel Oils by Editorial

Officials Call For End To Use Of Dirty Fuel Oils

City Council Member Costa Constantinides, Majority Leader Jimmy Van Bramer, and state Senator Michael Gianaris on December 9th called for an end to the use of numbers 6 and 4 fuel oil in power plants. They were joined by the Astoria Houses Tenants Association, Queensbridge Houses Tenants Association, Ravenswood Houses Tenants Association, Jacob Riis Senior Center, Urban Upbound, American Lung Association, Asthma Coalition of Queens, and WeACT.

Ending the use of Number 6 and 4 oils would help reduce emissions produced by the plants in order to meet goals set by the Environmental Protection Agency’s Clean Power Plan. They called on the power plant operators to demonstrate how they plan to comply with Local Law 38 of 2015, which requires that they phase out use of number 6 oil in plants citywide by 2020. They also called on the plant operators to phase out use of number 4 oil sooner than the scheduled 2030 phase-out. Numbers 6 and 4 oils are considered to be the dirtiest grades of oil available. They are linked to air pollutants that pose risk to public health, including particulate matter, nitrous oxides and sulfur dioxide.