New York CIty Council Member Ben Kallos

Education

Overcrowding in East Side public schools threatens to deny a generation of children their constitutional right to a "<a href="http://www.cfequity.org/&quot; target="_BLANK"><strong>sound basic education.</strong></a>" We must make more school seats available now, build more schools to keep up with current development, and investigate new solutions for building educational infrastructure.<br><br>I have a strong commitment to public education that stems from being a graduate of the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.bxscience.edu/&quot; target="_BLANK"><strong>Bronx High School of Science</strong></a>, State University of New York's&nbsp;<a href="http://www.albany.edu/&quot; target="_BLANK"><strong>University at Albany</strong></a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://law.buffalo.edu/&quot; target="_BLANK"><strong>University at Buffalo Law School</strong></a>. I helped create Community Board 8’s Youth and Education Committee, identified a&nbsp;<a href="http://kallosforcouncil.com/sites/default/files/DYCD_Bus.pdf&quot; target="_BLANK"><strong>Free Yellow Bus Program</strong></a>&nbsp;for local youth service providers, and created an internship program to better serve the youth and education needs of our community. As your Council member I will continue to fight for increased funding for youth services and education.

Amsterdam News De Blasio and City Council begin universal after-school push by Stephon Johnson


De Blasio and City Council begin universal after-school push

The bills, authored by Rose, Education Committee Chair Mark Treyger and Council Member Ben Kallos, would help counter the reality of parents working longer hours and spending more time away from the house. A recent study from WalletHub concluded that the average New York City employee works 40.3 hours per week, which is the longest average work week of the 116 cities reviewed by the personal finance site.

“After-school programs provide vital learning, enrichment and personal growth opportunities for students. Expanding after-school programming to all K-12 students who wish to enroll will keep our children safe, encourage academic achievement and inspire participation in extracurricular activities,” stated Treyger, mentioning that the bills would “support students to excel beyond the classroom and deliver kinesthetic learning all year round.”

Brooklyn Reporter Advocates endorse plan for universal after-school programs by Paula Katinas

Advocates endorse plan for universal after-school programs

A universal after-school program would provide academic enrichment and recreational activities for kids, according to lawmakers. Students at McKinley Intermediate School learn coding during school hours under a special program.

BOROUGHWIDE — New York City has universal pre-kindergarten classes. Next up: universal after-school.

A proposal by a trio of city councilmembers, including Brooklyn’s Mark Treyger, to have universal after-school programs in all schools has won praise from organizations that work with young people.

“After-school programs provide our students an outlet to experience non-traditional and non-academic learning opportunities. After a long day of academics, students have the opportunity to learn something a different skill and craft such as our Guitar Ensemble that schools may not be able to provide during the day school hours,” said Jahzeel Montes, executive director of Internal Creations, Inc., an organization that teaches kids how to play classical guitar.

PIX11 NYC Council holds hearing on free after-school care by Ayana Harry

NYC Council holds hearing on free after-school care

MANHATTAN — City Councilman Ben Kallos is fighting for legislation that would create universal, free, after-school activities for all New York City public school students.

"After-school activities are literally thousands of dollars a year and that's just money most families don't have," Kallos told PIX11 News inside City Hall Tuesday.

"New Yorkers are working longer than anyone else in the country, and that is leaving kids

Upper East Side Patch UES City Council Rep Pushes For Universal After School Program by Brendan Krisel

UES City Council Rep Pushes For Universal After School Program

Councilmember Ben Kallos authored two bills that require the city to meet all after school slot requests for public school students.

An Upper East Side lawmaker authored two bills that would require the city to fill all requested after school slots. (Shutterstock)

UPPER EAST SIDE, NY — An Upper East Side representative in New York's city council is helping lead the push for universal after school programs by authoring bills that would require the city to offer programming for nearly 600,000 students who want after school but are kept on a waiting list.

Under legislation authored by City Councilman Ben Kallos awith Staten Island's Debi Rose and Brooklyn's Mark Treyger, all public school students between the ages of three and 21 would be guaranteed space in a program through a Universal After School initiative. The bill requires city education officials to keep an annual report on the availability and need of after school slots as well as costs of the program.

The lawmakers are also pushing a bill that mandates annual reporting on funding, applications and demographics of after school programs at city schools. Both bills were discussed Tuesday during a public hearing at City Hall.

 

AM New York Pols urge city to make universal after-school programming a reality by ALEJANDRA O’CONNELL-DOMENECH

Pols urge city to make universal after-school programming a reality

“Universal access to after school will increase and equalize educational opportunities, keep kids out of the criminal justice system, and make life easier for parents whose jobs keep them at work until at least 5 p.m.,” said Councilmember Ben Kallos, at an oversight hearing on after-school legislation on Tuesday. The Upper East side pol sponsored a bill in 2018 requiring that the city provide free after-school programs to every public school student between the ages of three through 21.

Kallos was joined by other members of the Youth Services committee including Councilmember Treyger who touched on his own after-school legislation proposed in 2018. Treyger’s bill would require annual reports by the Department of Education and DYCD on the demographics of the students at each after-school program including whether the student has special needs or is an English language learner. The report would also require that the agencies note the eligibility criteria for each program and the amount and source for program funding. 

New York Daily News NYC Council to hold hearing on universal after-school by Michael Elsen-Rooney

NYC Council to hold hearing on universal after-school

“I want to wake up in a city where all public students have universal after-school,” said City Councilman Ben Kallos (D–Manhattan), the sponsor of a 2018 bill that would require the city to offer free after-school to any public school student ages 3-21 who requests it.

“Universal access to after-school will increase and equalize educational opportunities, keep kids out of the criminal justice system, and make life easier for parents whose jobs keep them at work until at least 5 p.m., if not longer,” Kallos said.

Upper East Side Patch City Commits 184 Additional K-8 Seats To Upper East Side by Brenden Krisel

City Commits 184 Additional K-8 Seats To Upper East Side

UPPER EAST SIDE, NY — Nearly 200 additional K-8 public school seats are being allocated to the Upper East Side as a result of a 2018 law that changed the way the city determined the need for seats, local City Councilman Ben Kallos announced Thursday.

The School Construction Authority is now planning to build 824 new K-8 seats on the Upper East Side by 2024, a spokesman for Kallos said. In last year's SCA proposed five-year master plan, the city agency allocated just 640 seats to the neighborhood. The amendment represents a gain of 184 seats for the neighborhood.

Kallos attributes the additional Upper East Side seats to a law he authored and passed in 2018 that requires the SCA to disclose the methods and formulas it uses to decide where and when to build new schools.

City and State Hearing expected on bill to equip NYC school buses with stop-arm cameras by City and State

Hearing expected on bill to equip NYC school buses with stop-arm cameras

The New York City Council aims to hold a hearing this month on a bill aiming to equip school buses with cameras to catch illegally passing vehicles, Councilman Ydanis Rodriguez said during a panel hosted by City & State and BusPatrol on Tuesday.

“We’re looking to have a hearing mostly likely the 16th or 18th of December,” Rodriguez said.

The bill, sponsored by Councilman Ben Kallos, would require the city to install cameras on nearly 10,000 school buses transporting students across the five boroughs that would record cars that pass when a bus’s stop sign is deployed. A new law signed by the governor in August gave local officials the ability to put cameras on buses, with the goal of finding and fining drivers found to be illegally passing buses letting children off. Both Suffolk and Nassau counties have already approved similar measures.

New York Daily News City lawmakers demand answers from Education Dept. on delayed school bus GPS tech by By MICHAEL ELSEN-ROONEY

City lawmakers demand answers from Education Dept. on delayed school bus GPS tech

The letter, authored by Council Members Robert Holden (D–Queens) and Ben Kallos (D–Manhattan), and signed by 20 other council members, questioned why the Education Department didn’t comply with a January law requiring the agency to make real-time GPS tracking available to parents starting this past September. “We...demand that the DOE explain its error and abide by the law immediately for the sake of our students and parents,” the lawmakers said in the note sent Friday. Lawmakers passed a bill in February to shore up city school bus service after frequent delays and missing school buses last year. The law required that the city make real-time GPS data available to “authorized parents or guardians” starting at the beginning of this school year.