Marine Transfer Station Updates

Press Coverage
New York Post
Wednesday, November 5, 2014

Transporting Manhattan’s garbage through a controversial ­Upper East Side waste-transfer station would cost triple what the city is now paying, according to a new study.

The findings of the Independent Budget Office provided new ammunition to opponents who have been fighting the waterfront transfer station since it was first proposed in 2006 by the Bloomberg administration.

The IBO said trash that now costs $93 a ton to ship to New Jersey and Yonkers for incineration would cost $278 a ton via the transfer station, which is ­ under construction.

Read more


Press Release

Skyrocketing costs of waste disposal at the 91st St. Marine Transfer Station have shot up to $632.5 million over a 20-year period, nearly three times the amount of the current waste disposal method, according to an independent report released today. The Independent Budget Office (IBO) issued the report in response to an April 8 letter from Council Member Kallos requesting update from a 2012 report to previous Council Member Jessica Lappin. The 2012 IBO report showed that the cost of waste disposal through the 91st St. Marine Transfer Station would be at $238/ton. It has since shot up by $40 per ton, to $278 per ton. Download the IBO Report

Read more


Video
Tuesday, August 5, 2014
See video
Read more


Press Coverage
The Epoch Times
Sunday, September 14, 2014

Though construction for the 91st St. Upper East Side garbage station is already underway and slated for completion by March 2016, city and state elected officials opposed to its existence are not letting up.

On Sunday, they gathered with local residents and anti-garbage-station groups in front of the construction site, calling for a public hearing to review the permits the city obtained from the state Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC). 

The permits, issued back in 2009, are due for renewal this October. U.S. representative Carolyn Maloney, state assemblywoman Deborah Glick, city councilman Ben Kallos, and others argue that since the permits were first issued, new federal standards have been established to improve resiliency post-Superstorm Sandy, which will now place the garbage station within a flood zone.

- Read more


Press Coverage
The Epoch Times
Sunday, September 14, 2014

Though construction for the 91st St. Upper East Side garbage station is already underway and slated for completion by March 2016, city and state elected officials opposed to its existence are not letting up.

On Sunday, they gathered with local residents and anti-garbage-station groups in front of the construction site, calling for a public hearing to review the permits the city obtained from the state Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC). 

The permits, issued back in 2009, are due for renewal this October. U.S. representative Carolyn Maloney, state assemblywoman Deborah Glick, city councilman Ben Kallos, and others argue that since the permits were first issued, new federal standards have been established to improve resiliency post-Superstorm Sandy, which will now place the garbage station within a flood zone.

- Read more


Press Coverage
Gotham Gazette
Monday, August 4, 2014

The basic philosophy behind the Solid Waste Management Plan is to establish a more equitable -and less impactful- waste processing system, with infrastructure in every borough. Not surprisingly, communities targeted for new and/or upgraded waste infrastructure facilities are responding with bitter opposition.

Opponents to the 91st St Marine Transfer Station say that, besides taking DSNY trucks off the road, the station will not contribute to a more environmentally sustainable waste management system in New York City. "It [the transfer station] harms residents," said Council Member Ben Kallos, who represents the area.

"Instead of being located in an industrial area, it is being placed...between an Olympic training ground serving 30,000 children from all five boroughs and a public housing development with 1,173 units, and within feet of 6 schools and 22,056 residents."

Opponents like Kallos argue that the City should be focused on reducing the actual waste stream, and not on large capital projects.

- Read more


Press Coverage
Our Town
Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Councilman Ben Kallos condemned the arrests and the city’s actions.

“We as a community joined together in a grassroots action to exercise our First Amendment rights,” said Kallos. “It’s a dark day for democracy when an administration is arresting seniors and NYCHA residents who are trying to protect a children’s playground from a garbage dump.”

- Read more


Press Coverage
New York Daily News
Thursday, May 22, 2014

In a letter to City Hall, officials who oppose the 91st St. Marine Transfer station ask Mayor de Blasio to investigate the hikes in a probe similar to the one he announced of the new 911 system. That project was $1 billion over budget and six years over due.

“Responsible budgeting would require oversight and review,” said the letter from six elected officials, including City Councilman Ben Kallos, state Sen. Liz Krueger and Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney.

- Read more


Press Coverage
Curbed
Sunday, May 25, 2014

In a letter to City Hall, six elected officials—including City Councilman Ben Kallos, State Senator Liz Kruger, and Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney—are calling for increased oversight from Mayor de Blasio, as well as a probe into the project's budget similar to the one he recently announced over the new 911 system that's $1 billion over-budget and six years late.

- Read more


Press Coverage
Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Tuesday, June 3, 2014

Councilman Ben Kallos (D-Upper East Side) urged the city to re-think the whole plan.

“It is time to re-imagine our solid waste management plan to reduce, reuse and recycle, instead of putting Marine Transfer Stations in densely residential neighborhoods,” he said. “A forward-thinking plan for a greener city will provide relief to over-burdened neighborhoods and protect the thousands of residents and students within feet of these proposed marine transfer stations.”

- Read more


Press Release

Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney, State Senator Liz Krueger, Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer, Assembly Member Dan Quart, Council Member Dan Garodnick and Council Member Ben Kallos today urgently requested a 60-day pause to review the exploding costs of the 91st St. Marine Transfer Station similar to the recent pause and review of the costly and delayed Emergency Communications Transformation Program.

Read more


Press Coverage
Huffington Post
Monday, March 24, 2014

Check out this video of New York City Council Member Benjamin Kallos coolly picking apart an element of Bloomberg's old trash plan that has gone out of control.

The collection and disposal of trash in New York City, but particularly in Manhattan, is achieved through a mixture of poorly regulated private trash vehicles and relatively well-maintained and environmentally sound government ones. Recycling rates are embarrassingly low, 15 percent compared to up to 75 percent in other cities.

- Read more


Press Release

New York, NY -- Council Member Ben Kallos joined the Committee on Solid Waste Management Preliminary Budget Hearing today, where he testified on the irresponsible budgeting and bad policy of the Upper Manhattan Marine Transfer Station.  A hotly contested exchange with outgoing Sanitation Commissioner John Doherty revealed the out-of-hand costs and poor environmentalism of the old waste disposal model -- particularly the Marine Transfer Station in Upper Manhattan, which would shift from waste disposal in New Jersey to burdening Manhattan's East Side and Staten Island.

Read more


Press Coverage
Our Town
Wednesday, February 19, 2014

A new report by a group opposing the construction of the waste transfer station on the Upper East Side claims that the city’s comprehensive waste management plan is deeply flawed –the latest salvo in a battle between local residents and a city that’s struggling to adequately deal with the trash it generates.

- Read more


Press Coverage
New York Daily News
Friday, February 14, 2014

As Upper East Siders continue their campaign to upend the reopening of the E. 91st St. waste transfer station, the politicians refuse to suggest an alternative site. Mayor de Blasio and Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito support the five borough plan.

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/uptown/pols-trash-talk-leads-article-1.1613973#ixzz2tuMD8Mzr

- Read more


Solution

One of Mayor Bloonmberg's most promising initiatives has been the effort to give the City's river shorelines back to the people as an "emerald necklace". What better jewel for such a necklace that a pier at 91st Street and the East River that provides access to the river from the Bobby Wagner Walk and the ramp that currently bisects the Asphalt Green complex.

This pier could and should be a major destination for the citizens of Manhattan and the other boroughs. Joggers use the Bobby Wagner Walk and its southern extension, fishermen cast their lines from the Walk and there is at least one rowing club that launches six-oared boats from the Walk just east of where 96th Street feeds on the northbound FDR. There is also a kayak club that launches from Astoria, across the river. All of these activities, plus picknicking, sitting in the sun, and contemplating the majesty of Hellgate would make such a pier an instant success--and a beautiful extension of the Carl Schurz Park/Gracie Mansion complex. It would be a wonderful draw for the citizens of the City, as well as the people--rich and poor--of the Yorkville neighborhood.

This would a great opportunity to shop around the City Council as it reconsiders the SWMP.

- Read more


Solution

 

I am strongly opposed to the Marine Transfer Station:

I am strongly opposed to the Marine Transfer Station at 91st St. As a member of Asphalt Green and a lifelong Upper East Sider, no one cares more about protecting our neighborhood. I've championed reform of the citywide trash plan to reduce waste and support existing composting plans and believe New York City should transition from 15% to 75% recycling to match other major cities like San Francisco. 
 
I eager to build a broad coalition to fight the Marine Transfer Station, and all elected officials that I have had the pleasure of working with are aware of my strong stance. I believe strongly that we can get this done together -- as a community and as a city.
 

An Industrial Plant Does Not Belong In Any Residential Neighborhood:

The City proposes to build a massive industrial garbage facility, called a Marine Transfer Station (MTS), in the middle of our residential neighborhood. There are no other actual or proposed municipal garbage facilities anywhere in the City that are located in a residential neighborhood. The proposed MTS will be:

  • 10-stories high and cover two acres over the East River,
  • Operating 24 hours a day, six days a week (and sometimes on Sundays),
  • Capable of processing up to 5,200 tons per day,
  • Accessed by a huge ramp that will literally cut in half the Asphalt Green athletic field and playground where thousands of children from around the City play.

As many as 500 trucks a day will rumble up and down our local streets to dump garbage there. This industrialization of our community will increase our dangerous air pollution by at least 16%, increase noise levels already beyond legal limits, and irreparably harm the East River estuary, among numerous other harms.  The City admits these facts in its reports.

 

The Cost Of This Garbage Facility Has Skyrocketed Out Of Control:

The City’s own estimated cost of the proposed MTS has already mushroomed from $55 million to $245 million. We expect it will cost far more—up to $400 million. Why will it cost so much? The facility will be constructed from barges on the river, and be more than three times larger than is necessary for the 1500 tons of garbage it is supposed to handle. Rather than wasting our hard-earned tax dollars, the City should be spending this money on after-school programs, and teachers, police, firefighters and others who improve our quality of life.

There Are Sane Trash Solutions:

The City plans to dump garbage at the MTS and then ship that trash on barges to costly and environmentally unfriendly landfills that have not been identified yet. That multi-step, hugely expensive process, which will send “garbage barges to nowhere,” is not a sane solution. It is much more sensible to continue what the City is currently doing—transporting much of Manhattan’s residential trash in clean air vehicles directly to a “waste to energy” plant in New Jersey. The garbage is then converted to much-needed electrical energy.

That is a sane solution that preserves precious resources, and answers the City’s “borough equity” argument: other boroughs will not be absorbing Manhattan’s residential garbage that is disposed of in this way. It is not equitable to single out our residential neighborhood as the only one in the City with an industrial municipal waste facility.

 

- Read more