Marine Transfer Station

Petition to Dump the Dump!

 

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The Marine Transfer Station at 91st St. turns good urban planning on its head, putting a Marine Transfer Station in a densely residential neighborhood instead of an industrial zone. I oppose the site and believe it represents poor policy-making that must be reversed. If you agree, please sign the petition.

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Get regular updates just about how we can work together to defeat the Marine Transfer Station.

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We continue to fight the Marine Transfer Station and thanks to your support we’ve already accomplished:

  • Ensured zoned trash pickup is done fairly to protect the East Side;
  • Brought attention to dangers of garbage trucks in residential neighborhoods
  • following tragic death of local resident hit by a garbage truck;
  • Moved the ramp one block north to protect 35,000 children from all over the city who play at Asphalt Green in partnership with P2P and the local community;
  • Introduced air quality monitoring legislation to protect us from pollution;
  • Forced commitments from DSNY under oath to limit use to only 1,800 of the total 5,200 tons per day capacity, keeping more than 300 garbage trucks off our streets;
  • Advocated for and secured funding for guardrails on garbage trucks and other large city vehicles;
  • Advocated for and won a citywide goal of zero waste to make Marine Transfer-to-landfill obsolete by 2030;
  • Exposed high costs increasing from $93/ton to $278/ton for a total price tag of $632 million;
  • Built a three borough coalition against garbage dumps in residential neighborhoods.

I look forward to working with residents like you to find new strategies to stop the Marine Transfer Station.

Updates

Press Coverage
NY1
Thursday, November 6, 2014

A new study finds that the plan for an Upper East Side waste transfer station would triple its current costs to the city.

The Independent Budget Office's study says it currently costs $93 a ton to drive trash from Manhattan to New Jersey and Yonkers.

It indicates the transfer station would bring that cost to $278 per ton.

The total cost over the next 20 years would increase from $253 million to $632 million, which is actually a more expensive estimate than the budget office made two years ago when it looked at the issue. 

City Councilman Ben Kallos, who requested the report, hopes the numbers will encourage Mayor Bill de Blasio to end the plan for the transfer station, which has drawn several protests over the months.

Read more

Press Coverage
The Real Deal
Wednesday, November 5, 2014

The proposed Upper East Side waste-transfer station would cost triple what the city currently pays to transport garbage through the borough, according to a study from the Independent Budget Office.

Moving garbage to New Jersey and Yonkers for incineration would cost $278 per ton through the controversial station, rather than $93 per ton, as it does now. Over the next 20 years, the city would pay $632 million to dispose of Manhattan’s trash with the new station at East 91st Street. The price tag now is $253 million.

“The per-ton export cost is higher under the MTS option due to the more costly multimodal method of transporting the waste from the transfer station to its final destination via barge and rail,” a spokesperson for the Independent Budget Office told the New York Post.

City Council member Ben Kallos of the Upper East Side requested the study in April.

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Press Coverage
New York Post
Wednesday, November 5, 2014

Transporting Manhattan’s garbage through a controversial ­Upper East Side waste-transfer station would cost triple what the city is now paying, according to a new study.

The findings of the Independent Budget Office provided new ammunition to opponents who have been fighting the waterfront transfer station since it was first proposed in 2006 by the Bloomberg administration.

The IBO said trash that now costs $93 a ton to ship to New Jersey and Yonkers for incineration would cost $278 a ton via the transfer station, which is ­ under construction.

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Press Release

Skyrocketing costs of waste disposal at the 91st St. Marine Transfer Station have shot up to $632.5 million over a 20-year period, nearly three times the amount of the current waste disposal method, according to an independent report released today. The Independent Budget Office (IBO) issued the report in response to an April 8 letter from Council Member Kallos requesting update from a 2012 report to previous Council Member Jessica Lappin. The 2012 IBO report showed that the cost of waste disposal through the 91st St. Marine Transfer Station would be at $238/ton. It has since shot up by $40 per ton, to $278 per ton. Download the IBO Report

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Video
Tuesday, August 5, 2014
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Press Coverage
The Epoch Times
Sunday, September 14, 2014

Though construction for the 91st St. Upper East Side garbage station is already underway and slated for completion by March 2016, city and state elected officials opposed to its existence are not letting up.

On Sunday, they gathered with local residents and anti-garbage-station groups in front of the construction site, calling for a public hearing to review the permits the city obtained from the state Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC). 

The permits, issued back in 2009, are due for renewal this October. U.S. representative Carolyn Maloney, state assemblywoman Deborah Glick, city councilman Ben Kallos, and others argue that since the permits were first issued, new federal standards have been established to improve resiliency post-Superstorm Sandy, which will now place the garbage station within a flood zone.

- Read more

Press Coverage
The Epoch Times
Sunday, September 14, 2014

Though construction for the 91st St. Upper East Side garbage station is already underway and slated for completion by March 2016, city and state elected officials opposed to its existence are not letting up.

On Sunday, they gathered with local residents and anti-garbage-station groups in front of the construction site, calling for a public hearing to review the permits the city obtained from the state Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC). 

The permits, issued back in 2009, are due for renewal this October. U.S. representative Carolyn Maloney, state assemblywoman Deborah Glick, city councilman Ben Kallos, and others argue that since the permits were first issued, new federal standards have been established to improve resiliency post-Superstorm Sandy, which will now place the garbage station within a flood zone.

- Read more

Press Coverage
Gotham Gazette
Monday, August 4, 2014

The basic philosophy behind the Solid Waste Management Plan is to establish a more equitable -and less impactful- waste processing system, with infrastructure in every borough. Not surprisingly, communities targeted for new and/or upgraded waste infrastructure facilities are responding with bitter opposition.

Opponents to the 91st St Marine Transfer Station say that, besides taking DSNY trucks off the road, the station will not contribute to a more environmentally sustainable waste management system in New York City. "It [the transfer station] harms residents," said Council Member Ben Kallos, who represents the area.

"Instead of being located in an industrial area, it is being placed...between an Olympic training ground serving 30,000 children from all five boroughs and a public housing development with 1,173 units, and within feet of 6 schools and 22,056 residents."

Opponents like Kallos argue that the City should be focused on reducing the actual waste stream, and not on large capital projects.

- Read more