Marine Transfer Station

Petition to Dump the Dump!

 

Subscribe to MTS Updates

The Marine Transfer Station at 91st St. turns good urban planning on its head, putting a Marine Transfer Station in a densely residential neighborhood instead of an industrial zone. I oppose the site and believe it represents poor policy-making that must be reversed. If you agree, please sign the petition.

Your Information
 

Get regular updates just about how we can work together to defeat the Marine Transfer Station.

* indicates required

 

Updates

Press Coverage
The Real Deal
Wednesday, November 5, 2014

The proposed Upper East Side waste-transfer station would cost triple what the city currently pays to transport garbage through the borough, according to a study from the Independent Budget Office.

Moving garbage to New Jersey and Yonkers for incineration would cost $278 per ton through the controversial station, rather than $93 per ton, as it does now. Over the next 20 years, the city would pay $632 million to dispose of Manhattan’s trash with the new station at East 91st Street. The price tag now is $253 million.

“The per-ton export cost is higher under the MTS option due to the more costly multimodal method of transporting the waste from the transfer station to its final destination via barge and rail,” a spokesperson for the Independent Budget Office told the New York Post.

City Council member Ben Kallos of the Upper East Side requested the study in April.

Read more

Press Coverage
New York Post
Wednesday, November 5, 2014

Transporting Manhattan’s garbage through a controversial ­Upper East Side waste-transfer station would cost triple what the city is now paying, according to a new study.

The findings of the Independent Budget Office provided new ammunition to opponents who have been fighting the waterfront transfer station since it was first proposed in 2006 by the Bloomberg administration.

The IBO said trash that now costs $93 a ton to ship to New Jersey and Yonkers for incineration would cost $278 a ton via the transfer station, which is ­ under construction.

Read more

Press Release

Skyrocketing costs of waste disposal at the 91st St. Marine Transfer Station have shot up to $632.5 million over a 20-year period, nearly three times the amount of the current waste disposal method, according to an independent report released today. The Independent Budget Office (IBO) issued the report in response to an April 8 letter from Council Member Kallos requesting update from a 2012 report to previous Council Member Jessica Lappin. The 2012 IBO report showed that the cost of waste disposal through the 91st St. Marine Transfer Station would be at $238/ton. It has since shot up by $40 per ton, to $278 per ton. Download the IBO Report

Read more

Video
Tuesday, August 5, 2014
Read more

Press Coverage
The Epoch Times
Sunday, September 14, 2014

Though construction for the 91st St. Upper East Side garbage station is already underway and slated for completion by March 2016, city and state elected officials opposed to its existence are not letting up.

On Sunday, they gathered with local residents and anti-garbage-station groups in front of the construction site, calling for a public hearing to review the permits the city obtained from the state Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC). 

The permits, issued back in 2009, are due for renewal this October. U.S. representative Carolyn Maloney, state assemblywoman Deborah Glick, city councilman Ben Kallos, and others argue that since the permits were first issued, new federal standards have been established to improve resiliency post-Superstorm Sandy, which will now place the garbage station within a flood zone.

- Read more

Press Coverage
The Epoch Times
Sunday, September 14, 2014

Though construction for the 91st St. Upper East Side garbage station is already underway and slated for completion by March 2016, city and state elected officials opposed to its existence are not letting up.

On Sunday, they gathered with local residents and anti-garbage-station groups in front of the construction site, calling for a public hearing to review the permits the city obtained from the state Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC). 

The permits, issued back in 2009, are due for renewal this October. U.S. representative Carolyn Maloney, state assemblywoman Deborah Glick, city councilman Ben Kallos, and others argue that since the permits were first issued, new federal standards have been established to improve resiliency post-Superstorm Sandy, which will now place the garbage station within a flood zone.

- Read more

Press Coverage
Gotham Gazette
Monday, August 4, 2014

The basic philosophy behind the Solid Waste Management Plan is to establish a more equitable -and less impactful- waste processing system, with infrastructure in every borough. Not surprisingly, communities targeted for new and/or upgraded waste infrastructure facilities are responding with bitter opposition.

Opponents to the 91st St Marine Transfer Station say that, besides taking DSNY trucks off the road, the station will not contribute to a more environmentally sustainable waste management system in New York City. "It [the transfer station] harms residents," said Council Member Ben Kallos, who represents the area.

"Instead of being located in an industrial area, it is being placed...between an Olympic training ground serving 30,000 children from all five boroughs and a public housing development with 1,173 units, and within feet of 6 schools and 22,056 residents."

Opponents like Kallos argue that the City should be focused on reducing the actual waste stream, and not on large capital projects.

- Read more

Press Coverage
Our Town
Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Councilman Ben Kallos condemned the arrests and the city’s actions.

“We as a community joined together in a grassroots action to exercise our First Amendment rights,” said Kallos. “It’s a dark day for democracy when an administration is arresting seniors and NYCHA residents who are trying to protect a children’s playground from a garbage dump.”

- Read more

Press Coverage
New York Daily News
Thursday, May 22, 2014

In a letter to City Hall, officials who oppose the 91st St. Marine Transfer station ask Mayor de Blasio to investigate the hikes in a probe similar to the one he announced of the new 911 system. That project was $1 billion over budget and six years over due.

“Responsible budgeting would require oversight and review,” said the letter from six elected officials, including City Councilman Ben Kallos, state Sen. Liz Krueger and Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney.

- Read more

Press Coverage
Curbed
Sunday, May 25, 2014

In a letter to City Hall, six elected officials—including City Councilman Ben Kallos, State Senator Liz Kruger, and Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney—are calling for increased oversight from Mayor de Blasio, as well as a probe into the project's budget similar to the one he recently announced over the new 911 system that's $1 billion over-budget and six years late.

- Read more